English 8

This course focuses on grammar, usage, and mechanics as a foundation for further secondary education.  Students will examine word use, sentence structure, and paragraph development.  Vocabulary building is also a concentration in this course.  Students will read stories, essays, and poetry, and will begin to develop an understanding of basic literary concepts that will serve as a foundation for the formal study of literature.

English I, English I Honors

The goal of English I is to develop and increase the student’s proficiency in writing as well as in the understanding and appreciation of literature.  English I includes a brief review of grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, and usage that will be implemented into various topics of analytical study and within the context of writing assignments throughout the year.  In order to develop critical thinking skills and to expose students to models of good writing, several genres of literature will be considered (drama, novels, poetry, essays, etc.), along with the elements of literature and literary devices.  Standardized test preparation will be accomplished by working practice standardized tests.  Vocabulary will be studied within the context of literature and through direct vocabulary instruction.  Mandatory participation in the Accelerated Reader Program hones students’ reading and vocabulary skills.

English II, English II Honors

The goal of English II is to continue to develop and increase the student’s proficiency of academic writing and in understanding and appreciating the historical and cultural importance of world literature.  English II includes a brief review of varying types of sentence structure, punctuation, and usage and will be ongoing topics of study within the context of the writing assignments throughout the year.  In order to reinforce critical thinking skills and to expose students to models of good writing, several genres of literature will be considered (drama, novels, poetry, essays, etc.), along with the elements of literature and literary devices.  Standardized test preparation will be accomplished by working practice standardized tests.  Vocabulary will be studied within the context of literature and through direct vocabulary instruction.

English III - American Literature

The goal of English III is to continue to develop and increase the student’s proficiency in academic writing and in understanding and appreciating the historical and cultural importance of American literature.  English III includes a brief review of varying types of sentence structure, punctuation, and usage and will be ongoing topics of study within the context of the writing assignments throughout the year.  In order to reinforce critical thinking skills, and to expose students to models of good writing, several genres of American literature are considered (drama, novels, poetry, essays, etc.) along with the elements of literature and literary devices.  Standardized test preparation will be accomplished by working practice standardized tests.  Vocabulary will be studied within the context of literature and through direct vocabulary instruction.

Language and Composition AP

The Advanced Placement Language and Composition course is designed to prepare students to “write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives” (The College Board AP English Course Description. May 2007, May 2008).  The course curriculum is designed to reflect the criteria established by the College Board, thus the assignments focus on expository, analytical persuasive writings.  The assigned readings are predominantly nonfiction, yet some poetry and fiction are included to further reinforce students’ reading proficiency and critical thinking skills.  Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board AP exam in May.

English IV - British Literature

The goal of English IV is to develop and increase the student’s proficiency in academic writing and in understanding and appreciating the historical and cultural importance of British literature.  English IV includes a brief review of varying types of sentence structures, punctuation, and usage, which will be ongoing topics of study within the context of the writing assignments throughout the year.  In order to reinforce critical thinking skills and expose students to models of good writing, several genres of British literature are considered (drama, novels, poetry, essays, etc.) along with the elements of literature and literary devices.  Standardized test preparation will be accomplished by working practice standardized tests.  Vocabulary will be studied within the context of literature and through direct vocabulary instruction.

Literature and Composition AP

The Advanced Placement Literature and Writing course is designed to deepen each student’s understanding of the ways in which writers manipulate language for the purpose of illustrating both meaning and beauty. An integral part of writing assignments focuses upon critical analysis of literature and includes the composition of expository, analytical and argumentative essays reflecting the three objectives: writing to understand a literary work, writing to explain a literary work, and writing to evaluate a literary work.  Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the College Board AP exam in May.

English V, English V Honors - World Literature

The goal of English V is to develop and increase the student’s proficiency in academic writing and in understanding and appreciating the historical and cultural importance of World literature.  English V includes a brief review of varying types of sentence structures, punctuation, and usage, which will be ongoing topics of study within the context of the writing assignments throughout the year.  In order to reinforce critical thinking skills and to expose students to models of good writing, several genres of World literature are considered (drama, novels, poetry, essays, etc.) along with the elements of literature and literary devices.  Vocabulary will be studied within the context of literature and through direct vocabulary instruction.

Creative Writing I & II

This course will provide each student with the opportunity to creatively express herself through the composition of teacher-guided poetry and personal essays and to focus upon the vision, revision, craft, and artistry of her own individual writing style.  Written works will be submitted and presented to the class for the purpose of technical and literary analysis, criticism, and discussion.  In addition, each student will be instructed in the use of various forms of computer software in order to assist with the publication of the school’s literary magazine.

Publications I & II: Newspaper

Students learn desktop publishing by producing a school newspaper each nine weeks. Using the latest computer technology, the newspaper staff learns to write clearly, to develop various styles of news and feature writing, to compose layouts and visual design, and to use word processing effectively.  Revising and editing skills improve markedly.  All aspects of journalism are explored from conducting interviews to using digital photography and scanners.

Publications I & II: Yearbook

Basic photography and computer programs, PhotoShop, and In Design will be used to produce the school’s yearbook through a series of assignments and portfolios.  Basic computer terms are learned such as MB, Vector, Bitmap, JPEG, etc.

Film Studies

Storytelling is the most common way that humans communicate with one another.  Stories told with film have a tremendous influence on our attitudes and perceptions of the world around us.  In fact, films may be one of the most powerful tools in modern culture for shaping values and conveying information, especially about women. In this course, students will discuss the image of the empowered woman while studying the history of film and critically analyzing some of America’s greatest cinematic achievements.  Students will be responsible for reading several nonfiction articles, writing a series of short papers, completing interactive projects, and analyzing films.

Southern Literature

In this course, students will discuss how American writers have represented New Orleans in literature and film from the late 19th century to the present.  Students will analyze how some of the country's most interesting writers and film makers have engaged the city as well as compare how New Orleans natives represent New Orleans to how new comers and frequent visitors do.  Over the course of the semester, students will complete extensive fiction and nonfiction readings as well as write a series of  short papers and complete projects focusing on readings by such authors as Tennessee Williams, Walker Percy, Eudora Welty, William Faulkner, and Kate Chopin.

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